Chicago

AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5

Start the car and head to a “whoopee spot” where crime and corruption are hot! Kander and Ebb’s internationally-acclaimed musical about fame, fortune and justice features a headline-worthy story of how two icon-victs become Jazz Age celebrities. Set during the Prohibition era, this six-time Tony Award-winner, the longest-running American musical in Broadway history, includes showstopping standards such as “Cell Block Tango,” “Mister Cellophane” and the notorious “All That Jazz.”

First Muny Production Since 2012!

Performances begin at 8:15 p.m.

Sponsored by

Creative Team

Chris Bailey

Director / Choreographer

Muny: Jerome Robbins’ Broadway, Newsies (St. Louis Theater Circle Award), The Music Man, Into the Woods, My Fair Lady, Tarzan, West Side Story and Thoroughly Modern Millie. Broadway: Gettin’ the Band Back Together; Cyrano de Bergerac (movement director, Roundabout Theatre Company). Other New York Credits: Jerry Springer the Opera (New Group, 2018 Chita Rivera nomination), The New Yorkers and 1776 (New York City Center Encores!). 2013-2015 Academy Awards (Assistant Choreographer), the iconic 2013 opening number of The Tony Awards, The Entertainer (West End), Assassins (Menier Chocolate Factory). Upcoming: Back to the Future (2020, England).

Charlie Alterman

Music Director / Conductor

Returns to The Muny where he served as music director for the productions of Meet Me In St. Louis (2018), All Shook Up, Disney’s The Little Mermaid (2017), Young Frankenstein (2016), Hairspray (2015), Chicago (2012) and Legally Blonde (2011), as well as three Muny Magic at The Sheldon concerts. Broadway credits include Pippin, Godspell, Next to Normal, Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me (music director/actor) and Legally Blonde (associate conductor). Tours: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Next to Normal (music supervisor) and Grease (US/Asia). Regional includes: The Old Globe, Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, TUTS, La Jolla Playhouse, Arena Stage, Trinity Rep, Paper Mill Playhouse, Huntington Theatre and the Williamstown Theatre Festival. Concert appearances include shows with Brooke Shields, Frankie Avalon, Emily Skinner, Dana Reeve, Billy Porter, Carol Woods and Ken Page.

Show Guidelines

Set during the Prohibition era, the twenties are roaring, and merry murderesses Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly are both in Cook County jail awaiting trial for killing their lovers. A clever but shady lawyer, Billy Flynn, manipulates the press in his efforts to free both women. Roxie and Velma thrive on the publicity that the trial offers, and the two beautiful headline hunters plot to use their notoriety to further their stage careers, as well as to win their acquittals.

A six-time Tony Award-winner, Chicago is the longest-running American musical in Broadway history. It includes well-known standards such as “Cell Block Tango,” “Mister Cellophane” and the notorious “All That Jazz.”

Dialogue and lyrics throughout the show include mature languages and references to sexual situations. 

Language

The words ass, bastard, bitch, crap, damn, hell, screwing, shit and whore are each said or sung.

Sexual Innuendo

At the beginning of the show, two characters are in bed together.

Throughout the show, dialogue and lyrics include references to sexual situations.

Drugs and Alcohol

Numerous songs reference drinking and smoking, and alcohol and cigarettes may be used as props.

Violence

In two instances, a character shoots another character.

In the song “Cell Block Tango,” six women inmates sing about what caused them to murder their husbands.

A prisoner is hung for her crime.

Mature Content

Chicago opens with the line, “Welcome. Ladies and Gentlemen, you are about to see a story of murder, greed, corruption, violence, exploitation, adultery and treachery.” The musical then delves into all of these areas. The show aims to be provocative, which is part of its charm, and it does this by making fun of its characters in an entertaining way.

A character fantasizes about becoming a celebrity murderess. She fakes being pregnant to get more sympathy from the press.

The optimistic reporter “Mary Sunshine” is revealed to be a man.